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So we heard yesterday was International Rock Day..

Around here, we prefer our rocks to have a few holes in them. From the longest cave in the world, rock on! 🤘 🎸

And don't worry, this image is photoshopped. We haven't given permission to Ranger Eric to bring his electric guitar into the cave..yet.

#InternationalRockDay

Photo: A park ranger holds and pretends to play a royal blue and white guitar and is photoshopped into a big room in Mammoth Cave
... See MoreSee Less

So we heard yesterday was International Rock Day..

Around here, we prefer our rocks to have a few holes in them. From the longest cave in the world, rock on! 🤘 🎸 

And dont worry, this image is photoshopped. We havent given permission to Ranger Eric to bring his electric guitar into the cave..yet.

#InternationalRockDay

Photo: A park ranger holds and pretends to play a royal blue and white guitar and is photoshopped into a big room in Mammoth Cave

Comment on Facebook So we heard ...

Your social media guru is bringing their A game! This is awesome, although I’m still rolling on the floor over your video of what The Rangers were doing during Covid shut down😂🤣😍

Aaaa,..... yea,.... that"s aaa me!

Haven't given him permission "yet"! Lol

If you get a chance go

Awesome 😎

Tony Wylder I thought this was one of your posts..and a pic of you. lol

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William Burke “Skeets” Miller became a famous newspaper and radio reporter, somewhat by accident, in the 1920s. While working for the Courier-Journal in Louisville, Kentucky, Skeets Miller was sent to south-central Kentucky to cover the story of a man who had become trapped exploring a cave.

The entrapped man was Floyd Collins, a well-known caver in the Mammoth Cave region. In 1925 while exploring Sand Cave, Collins dislodged a rock and pinned his foot, preventing him from moving and trapping him in a small passageway. Many people arrived to the entrance of Sand Cave to try and free Floyd Collins. Even Skeets Miller himself, while recording his news stories, took time to crawl into the cave passage that held Collins to ask him questions and bring him food.

Eventually, Miller’s accounts of Collins’ entrapment made national headlines as the county waited to hear the fate of Floyd Collins. Unfortunately, on February 16th, 1925, Collins was pronounced dead.

Miller’s report of the tragedy at Sand Cave earned him a Pulitzer Prize on May 4th, 1926, at the age of 22 years. Miller later moved around the country working in radio and television for the National Broadcasting Company (NBC).

Photo: A black and white image of a young Skeets Miller sitting and taking a break at the Floyd Collins 1925 rescue.
... See MoreSee Less

William Burke “Skeets” Miller became a famous newspaper and radio reporter, somewhat by accident, in the 1920s. While working for the Courier-Journal in Louisville, Kentucky, Skeets Miller was sent to south-central Kentucky to cover the story of a man who had become trapped exploring a cave.

The entrapped man was Floyd Collins, a well-known caver in the Mammoth Cave region. In 1925 while exploring Sand Cave, Collins dislodged a rock and pinned his foot, preventing him from moving and trapping him in a small passageway. Many people arrived to the entrance of Sand Cave to try and free Floyd Collins. Even Skeets Miller himself, while recording his news stories, took time to crawl into the cave passage that held Collins to ask him questions and bring him food.

Eventually, Miller’s accounts of Collins’ entrapment made national headlines as the county waited to hear the fate of Floyd Collins. Unfortunately, on February 16th, 1925, Collins was pronounced dead.

Miller’s report of the tragedy at Sand Cave earned him a Pulitzer Prize on May 4th, 1926, at the age of 22 years. Miller later moved around the country working in radio and television for the National Broadcasting Company (NBC).

Photo: A black and white image of a young Skeets Miller sitting and taking a break at the Floyd Collins 1925 rescue.

Comment on Facebook William Burke ...

So sad. Kind of reminiscent of the Nutty Putty cave incident...except for the carnival-like atmosphere.

We visited the Sand Cave entrance in 1993. A weird feeling to stand in such a remote and quiet place and imagine the frenzied scene when Floyd was trapped.

I wonder to what extent this event inspired the 1951 movie "Ace in the Hole" starring Kirk Douglas as a newspaper reporter covering a man trapped in a mineshaft.

Don't forget the young pilot who flew Skeet's stories back to Louisville---some young dude named Lindbergh!

Read the book about Floyd Collins. So sad.

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We love this shout-out from our friends at Jewel Cave National Monument! ... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook 147256545292904_3408679819150544

Enjoyed visits to both Mammoth & Jewel, also Wind

We here in the Bluegrass State Our Very Proud of Mammoth Cave System! A Wonder of the World.Come and See for yourself what going Underground is all About.🌞🇺🇸😊

Glad I did this and would definitely agree it is a wonder of world, even though the entire time I had to fight back the idea of running out.

Was thrown off for a moment seeing the name of Jewel Cave immediately above a picture of Mammoth Cave (as it showed up on my phone screen), and was thinking to myself, “Wow, I had idea Jewel Cave looked so much like Mammoth Cave’s entrance...” Then I tried reading what was actually there. Come to think of it, that might be a lesson about the times we live in and the value of actually reading the science instead of a piece of the headline and the picture... Hmm.

Cj Burdette I need to go again, and would love for you to go this time!!!!

Some day, I'll take a trip on several cave national parks.

Funny... we live in South Dakota and have never been to Jewel Cave (but have flown down to Kentucky to go to Mammoth Cave 🤷‍♂️😂) Love Mammoth, love Kentucky! 🥰

Is the cave open ? Would love to go

I’m a direct descendant of John Houchin, I hope to visit someday soon. In the meantime, I always enjoy your posts!

Been to both!

Kristina DeMarco Leretsis we need to take TJ this summer

Dennis Paul need to go here someday

Carrie Whisenant

Stefanie Neuens is this where we were talking about going a while ago?

Fred Hardin

Kayla Spillman here’s place go

Michelle Hall

Mike Strang

Cynthia Rousseau

Yvonne Flack Stone could you do it?

Meagan Rice

Brandon Sears I wanna go

John Manuel Rendon

Joe Giberson Joseph H. Giberson III

Paul if you're still interested in visiting, this was an interesting read

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Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons
So we heard yesterday was International Rock Day..

Around here, we prefer our rocks to have a few holes in them. From the longest cave in the world, rock on! 🤘 🎸 

And don't worry, this image is photoshopped. We haven't given permission to Ranger Eric to bring his electric guitar into the cave..yet.

#InternationalRockDay

Photo: A park ranger holds and pretends to play a royal blue and white guitar and is photoshopped into a big room in Mammoth Cave
William Burke “Skeets” Miller became a famous newspaper and radio reporter, somewhat by accident, in the 1920s. While working for the Courier-Journal in Louisville, Kentucky, Skeets Miller was sent to south-central Kentucky to cover the story of a man who had become trapped exploring a cave.

The entrapped man was Floyd Collins, a well-known caver in the Mammoth Cave region. In 1925 while exploring Sand Cave, Collins dislodged a rock and pinned his foot, preventing him from moving and trapping him in a small passageway. Many people arrived to the entrance of Sand Cave to try and free Floyd Collins. Even Skeets Miller himself, while recording his news stories, took time to crawl into the cave passage that held Collins to ask him questions and bring him food.

Eventually, Miller’s accounts of Collins’ entrapment made national headlines as the county waited to hear the fate of Floyd Collins. Unfortunately, on February 16th, 1925, Collins was pronounced dead.

Miller’s report of the tragedy at Sand Cave earned him a Pulitzer Prize on May 4th, 1926, at the age of 22 years. Miller later moved around the country working in radio and television for the National Broadcasting Company (NBC).

Photo: A black and white image of a young Skeets Miller sitting and taking a break at the Floyd Collins 1925 rescue.
Summer is here! Throughout the summer season you can hike, camp, take a cave tour or paddle on the Green River here at Mammoth Cave! As you plan your trip you may want to keep in mind that temperatures and humidity levels can cause some heat related issues. Here are some tips to help you be prepared for those hot days ahead!

🔥 Wear light-colored, loose-fitting clothing
🔥 Plan outdoor activities for early morning or evening hours
🔥 Pace yourself
🔥 Wear sunscreen
🔥 Stay hydrated drink plenty of water or non-sugary sports drinks and avoid sugary drinks and alcohol 
🔥 Check local news for extreme heat alerts and cooling centers

#HeatSafety

Photo: A park ranger hat laying on the ground in front of a stone post and next to a black water bottle with an NPS arrowhead sticker on it
Thousands of signatures can be seen on the walls and ceilings of mammoth cave, some written in pencil, others etched into the rock, and some written in what’s called candle smoke writing.  

To create these signatures, a visitor would hold a candle to the ceiling and create a series of dots of smoke to form their name, often adding the year or date they were there, sometimes adding where they were visiting from, or even their occupation. The sheer number of signatures in mammoth cave means that much remains to be researched about most of the people who have left their names somewhere in the longest known cave in the world.

Photo: Dark smokey signatures crowd the ceiling of a cave room where a person stands dwarfed by the number of names.           
Photo by J. Wheet
Attention all Girl Scouts!

The National Park Service is commemorating the centennial of the ratification of the 19th Amendment along with the Girl Scouts of the USA with a special patch, activity guide, activity log, and other certificates and special awards!

Instructions on how to earn the patch and information on the Girl Scout Ranger Program, other youth programs, and the 19th Amendment can be found at the link below!

#GirlScoutsOfTheUSA

https://www.nps.gov/subjects/youthprograms/girl-scouts-19th-amendment.htm?fbclid=IwAR28PkV076etqRSQAqXBUKz7UhkrlHkBqybVzCEqHpLNfuR_RHiEQFGjNP0

Photo: A park ranger stands next to a child molding clay on a table. NPS Photo.
“There is nothing so American as our national parks...” - Franklin D. Roosevelt

As we celebrate the blessings of this great country, find a national park near you. National parks help preserve and protect many of our nation’s most iconic and historic sites. 
Photo caption: two rangers holding American flags in front of the entrance to mammoth cave.
Happy Independence Day!
#independenceday #4thofjuly
As we approach the holiday weekend, we'd like to share some helpful tips on how to enjoy your national parks safely and recreate responsibly! 

🦇 Please practice social distancing and keep adequate space between you and other park visitors

🦇 Look up and follow state and national CDC recommendations 

🦇 If a surface trail or area appears crowded, use another trail or come back to that spot when there are fewer people 

🦇 Trails on the surface and in the cave may be narrow. Please allow plenty of space between you and other visitors, and when possible, let others pass in wider trail spots and pause before narrow spots and let others pass before you continue on 

🦇 Face coverings and masks are recommended 

🦇 If you are considered high risk for contracting Covid19 or have Covid19 symptoms, please wait for a safer time to visit a national park 

At this time, tour tickets at Mammoth Cave are currently sold out through July 6th, 2020. There are numerous miles of surface hiking trails and river access points that you can enjoy at Mammoth Cave National Park without fees! Many parks also have virtual visit options that can be found on the National Park Service website!

We hope that this holiday weekend is a memorable, enjoyable, and safe one for all! 

#RecreateResponsibly #SocialDistancing 

Image description: A black and grey image of trees and a mountain in the background with the white outline of foot prints and words reading, "Please keep a safe distance. 6 feet. Enjoy your national park!"

https://www.nps.gov/planyourvisit/recreate-responsibly.htm
Mammoth Cave National Park will temporarily reopen the Green River Ferry and Green River Ferry Road to vehicular traffic on Monday, July 6 for service seven days a week from 6 am to 9:55 pm CST. The newly retrofitted ferry was certified for service by the United States Coast Guard, but construction on the south ramp of the vehicle crossing is still needed. Commuters should anticipate an additional closure of the ferry later in the summer.

“The updated ferry boat should improve the safety and efficiency of the ferry service,” said Superintendent Barclay Trimble. “The boat will sit higher in the water, carry more weight, and have longer ramps to reach further up the shoreline. Even though more work is needed on the south side ramps, the park does not want to impact visitors or our local community any more than possible. We are trying to set the construction date for the south ramp for the latest day possible so the project can be completed before the water rises in mid-November. We know the ferry is essential to many commuters and our neighboring businesses and we want to get back to normal operations.”

For more information on the Green River Ferry improvement projects and the Green River Ferry and road closure, please visit the park’s website www.nps.gov/maca/green-river-ferry-improvement-projects.htm or call the Green River Ferry Hotline at 270-758-2166 for current ferry operating status.

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