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Today is International Literacy Day! Authors and writers from all over the world have drawn inspiration from Mammoth Cave for generations.

Canadian author Lucy Maud Montgomery is known as one of the most famous writers in Canada’s history. Her well known works include a series beginning with the 1908 novel, Anne of Green Gables. In the summer of 1924, L. M. Montgomery visited Mammoth Cave. After her travels through Gothic Avenue, the Corkscrew, and Echo River, in a first-hand account Montgomery wrote, “Everyone who goes..leaves something of himself there – a little bit of his soul – of his personality. And he always wants to go back and find it.”

#InternationalLiteracyDay
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Today is International Literacy Day! Authors and writers from all over the world have drawn inspiration from Mammoth Cave for generations.

Canadian author Lucy Maud Montgomery is known as one of the most famous writers in Canada’s history. Her well known works include a series beginning with the 1908 novel, Anne of Green Gables. In the summer of 1924, L. M. Montgomery visited Mammoth Cave. After her travels through Gothic Avenue, the Corkscrew, and Echo River, in a first-hand account Montgomery wrote, “Everyone who goes..leaves something of himself there – a little bit of his soul – of his personality. And he always wants to go back and find it.”

#InternationalLiteracyDay

Today is the first Monday in September, which means it’s time to celebrate Labor Day! Labor Day was first celebrated in 1882 on September 5th in New York City. Today the nation pays tribute to the American worker, who has created much of the country’s strength, freedom and leadership. From all of us at Mammoth Cave National Park, Happy Labor Day!

Learn more about Labor Day at www.dol.gov/general/laborday/history
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Today is the first Monday in September, which means it’s time to celebrate Labor Day! Labor Day was first celebrated in 1882 on September 5th in New York City. Today the nation pays tribute to the American worker, who has created much of the country’s strength, freedom and leadership. From all of us at Mammoth Cave National Park, Happy Labor Day!

Learn more about Labor Day at https://www.dol.gov/general/laborday/history

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My favorite place to visit!

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PPCA Error: Due to Facebook API changes on September 4, 2020, it will no longer be possible to display a feed from a Facebook Page you are not an admin of. The Facebook feed below is not using a valid Access Token for this Facebook page and so will stop updating after this date.
Today is International Literacy Day! Authors and writers from all over the world have drawn inspiration from Mammoth Cave for generations.

Canadian author Lucy Maud Montgomery is known as one of the most famous writers in Canada’s history. Her well known works include a series beginning with the 1908 novel, Anne of Green Gables. In the summer of 1924, L. M. Montgomery visited Mammoth Cave. After her travels through Gothic Avenue, the Corkscrew, and Echo River, in a first-hand account Montgomery wrote, “Everyone who goes..leaves something of himself there – a little bit of his soul – of his personality. And he always wants to go back and find it.”

#InternationalLiteracyDay
Today is the first Monday in September, which means it’s time to celebrate Labor Day! Labor Day was first celebrated in 1882 on September 5th in New York City. Today the nation pays tribute to the American worker, who has created much of the country’s strength, freedom and leadership. From all of us at Mammoth Cave National Park, Happy Labor Day!

Learn more about Labor Day at https://www.dol.gov/general/laborday/history
The Houma, Cherokee, and other Native American tribes used the Purple Passionflower (Passiflora incarnata) for food, drink, and medicinal purposes. Fruits were eaten raw or boiled to make syrup, juice was made by crushing and straining the fruits, and the roots were used to "draw out inflammation" from wounds. Other uses of the plant were to treat liver problems and as a sedative to treat nervous conditions and hysteria.

To learn about other native uses of common plants in our area, explore the USDA link below!

https://plants.sc.egov.usda.gov/java/
Kentucky had enfranchised European-American women to vote in rural areas on tax and education issues since 1838. But for women of color, like Zemmie Bransford, co-owner of the Bransford Summer Resort and the wife of Mammoth Cave guide Matt Bransford, that was not the case. For Zemmie and other African American women, literacy tests and poll taxes would essentially prevent them from casting a vote for another 45 years when the Voting Rights Act was passed in 1965.  

Explore more “Stories of Suffrage” and learn about the fight for voting rights after the passage of the 19th Amendment at https://www.nps.gov/articles/what-s-next.htm

#NPS19th #FindYourPark
“The way to right wrongs is to turn the light of truth upon them.” - Ida B. Wells-Barnett

A century ago this year, the 19th amendment was signed and added to the constitution. This amendment, which allowed women the right to vote, only happened because a group of strong and diverse women and men worked together to promote change. “Forward Into Light” became a rallying cry for suffragists during the protests, which started as early as 1848, along with the colors purple and gold to represent freedom and dignity. On this day, August 26th, we celebrate Women’s Equality Day to commemorate those suffragists, but also to celebrate the many achievements of women since then and in the future. Here at Mammoth Cave National Park, we honor the success of those women years ago, the women of the National Park Service, and women around the world.  

Learn more about the 19th amendment and its ratification at:

https://www.nps.gov/subjects/womenshistory/19th-amendment.htm

#19thAmendment #WomensEqualityDay #ForwardIntoLight
A signature reading, "H Gratz, 1812" scratched on a rock in Mammoth Cave.
Photo of Hyman Gratz
The two-story recreated Declaration House (Graff House) in Independence National Historic Park with red and black brick and yellow shudders. NPS Photo.

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