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With the help of the National Park Foundation and Friends of Mammoth Cave group, Mammoth Cave Rangers are traveling across the state of Kentucky - from Paducah to Pikeville - to educate students on the wonders of the longest cave in the world! The first trip took us to McCracken County, where over 400 fourth graders got to do experiments showing the process of physical and chemical weathering on sandstone and limestone rock. ... See MoreSee Less

With the help of the National Park Foundation and Friends of Mammoth Cave group, Mammoth Cave Rangers are traveling across the state of Kentucky - from Paducah to Pikeville - to educate students on the wonders of the longest cave in the world! The first trip took us to McCracken County, where over 400 fourth graders got to do experiments showing the process of physical and chemical weathering on sandstone and limestone rock.

 

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I love this as that's what my dad did when he was a guide...would do at the Owensboro area schools.

Love this.

Frank Henry Green

The name “Mammoth Cave” comes from the size of the main passageways, but not all routes are mammoth sized. Cavers may have to crawl, climb, or slide on their bellies to get through. Depending on your comfort with enclosed spaces, a tight squeeze can be fun and exciting, but imagine crawling continuously for 100 feet, 1000 feet, or a mile! All while dragging your food, water, and extra lights behind you. These are the extreme conditions that cavers routinely endure.

Yet with that physical and mental exhaustion comes the excitement of discovery. A few monumental moments in Mammoth Cave history have occurred when explorers were able to find connections to other cave systems - in one way and out another - adding on many more miles all at once. But there were many failed attempts that led to these huge discoveries. Instead of finding a connection those explorers will have to turn around and retrace their footsteps right back through the original miserable route, and then return for the next expedition to try again.
... See MoreSee Less

The name “Mammoth Cave” comes from the size of the main passageways, but not all routes are mammoth sized. Cavers may have to crawl, climb, or slide on their bellies to get through. Depending on your comfort with enclosed spaces, a tight squeeze can be fun and exciting, but imagine crawling continuously for 100 feet, 1000 feet, or a mile! All while dragging your food, water, and extra lights behind you. These are the extreme conditions that cavers routinely endure.

Yet with that physical and mental exhaustion comes the excitement of discovery. A few monumental moments in Mammoth Cave history have occurred when explorers were able to find connections to other cave systems - in one way and out another - adding on many more miles all at once. But there were many failed attempts that led to these huge discoveries. Instead of finding a connection those explorers will have to turn around and retrace their footsteps right back through the original miserable route, and then return for the next expedition to try again.

 

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Is this the keyhole in the wild cave tour!? Loved that one!!

I’m getting nervous just looking at the photo. I did not do well on the Domes & Dripstones Tour. 😂

Gives me anxiety thinking about it, but I love the caves!

Or crawling continuously for over 3 miles. ... right Jeremy Reedy, Matt Mezydlo, and Derek Bristol? That's actually the same passage. K survey at the beginning of Left of the Trap

Nope nope nope. My anxiety is rising just looking at it. lol

On a tour once, we saw a tiny hole in the cave wall start to glow and flash faintly. Eventually a knapsack and a rope was thrown into the middle of our tour group. We all stood there in awe as 12 people emerged from this hole that was certainly smaller than a typical manhole you'd find on the street.

Is this a picture of the great Bruce Hatcher?

Jeremy Reedy’s hero, go Bruce. 😉

Holy moly. That’s intense. Hope you guys are doing well in BG!

That's not that small, he still has his helmet on. 😁

Awwwww. Look at that precious face!!!

My grandson and I visited in June. We saw one of these groups-I couldn’t do it, but sure admire those that do!!!!

My favorite 2nd family as once a MCNP Guide always a MCNP Guide...my father is a former MCNP guide. He always considers MCNP guides as his close friends.

hale naw....

God bless you

Gordon Perry... remember this date?? 😉😬

That is serious determination!

No way !!

Andrew Wagner The tour we didn’t do, lol

Nathan Sweet

Ben Alexander

Jonnie Gholson

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A good caver always carries 3 sources of light - batteries can eventually run low, and if that were to happen you’d be plunged into total darkness. How long without light do you think it would take for you to go blind?

While you may have heard from stories, movies, or perhaps even another cave tour that just a few days without light could cause permanent blindness, there are no studies that confirm this idea.

While some caves have wildlife evolved without eyes, this process of genetic mutation took thousands of years. There have been studies involving kittens and infant monkeys in total darkness for 10 days that found very temporary blindness resulting, studies indicate even less effect on mature animals. One example that illustrates the falseness of this myth is the 2010 Chilean miners’ incident. 33 miners were trapped underground without light for about two weeks till they were located, even then rescue remained difficult. Rescuers were able to get food, water, light, and even entertainment sources down to the miners until there were finally freed 69 days after the original mine collapse. The men were given sunglasses for the initial sunlight exposure but doctors expressed no concern of the loss of their eyesight.
... See MoreSee Less

A good caver always carries 3 sources of light - batteries can eventually run low, and if that were to happen you’d be plunged into total darkness. How long without light do you think it would take for you to go blind?

While you may have heard from stories, movies, or perhaps even another cave tour that just a few days without light could cause permanent blindness, there are no studies that confirm this idea. 

While some caves have wildlife evolved without eyes, this process of genetic mutation took thousands of years. There have been studies involving kittens and infant monkeys in total darkness for 10 days that found very temporary blindness resulting, studies indicate even less effect on mature animals. One example that illustrates the falseness of this myth is the 2010 Chilean miners’ incident. 33 miners were trapped underground without light for about two weeks till they were located, even then rescue remained difficult. Rescuers were able to get food, water, light, and even entertainment sources down to the miners until there were finally freed 69 days after the original mine collapse. The men were given sunglasses for the initial sunlight exposure but doctors expressed no concern of the loss of their eyesight.

 

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I recently came upon this wonderful gem of my grandparents visiting Mammoth Cave. The lanterns in your photo reminded me to share. It is dated 10/20/1946, 1 PM tour. We love Mammoth Cave!

So, of course they didn't lose their sight. Rescuers were able to get "food, water, light, and even entertainment" to them! 😎

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