Beaumont, Museum of the Gulf Coast

409-982-7000

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons

This message is only visible to site admins

PPCA Error: Due to Facebook API changes on September 4, 2020, it will no longer be possible to display a feed from a Facebook Page you are not an admin of. The Facebook feed below is not using a valid Access Token for this Facebook page and so will stop updating after this date.

Olivia, Martha, Rene, Martha, and Octavio are visitors from Chicago! This is their third time visiting the museum. They're big Janis Joplin fans, and they love 60s music. They bought tons of shirts and souvenirs from our gift shop! Thanks for stopping by and safe travels! ✌️❤️ 🗺️ #janisjoplin #Chicago #visitportarthurtx ... See MoreSee Less

Olivia, Martha, Rene, Martha, and Octavio are visitors from Chicago! This is their third time visiting the museum. Theyre big Janis Joplin fans, and they love 60s music. They bought tons of shirts and souvenirs from our gift shop!  Thanks for stopping by and safe travels!        ✌️❤️ 🗺️ #janisjoplin #chicago #visitportarthurtx

Happy Birthday Jerry LeVias
Born: Sept. 5, 1946 in Beaumont, Texas

Jerry LeVias attended Hebert High School where he played quarterback. Though he was small (5'9" and 177 pounds) he possessed great speed. Out of high school he was probably closer to 5'7” and only 140 pounds.
LeVias was the first black athlete to receive an athletic scholarship in the Southwestern Conference, attending Southern Methodist University. At the time the SWC was made up of all the larger Texas universities, and the University of Arkansas. While at SMU, LeVias made athletic and academic All-America teams and contributed to the Mustangs' first conference title in 18 years. LeVias wore the number 23 (for Psalm 23) which he also wore during his professional career, at his grandmother's insistence.
In an interview with the Houston Chronicle, LeVias called his years at SMU "living hell" due to the abuse he received from opposition players and, to some extent, his own contemporaries and stated that he would read the Serenity Prayer every morning before leaving for the day to get by. At that time, he was one of the few black students at SMU and the city of Dallas itself was still not fully integrated. Despite the unconditional support from SMU head coach Hayden Fry, LeVias was still a frequent target and recalled that he once overheard an alumnus telling Fry that he would withdraw his support from the university if Fry continued playing LeVias.
His records as a receiver still stand: 15 passes caught in one game (1968); 80 passes caught in one season (1968); 155 career catches; 1,131 yards receiving (1968); 2,275 career yards receiving; and a tied record for touchdown receptions in one game (3) and season record of TD receptions (8). He was chosen All-SWC in 1966, 1967, and 1968, and was an All-American as a senior.
Initially, considered too small for the NFL, LeVias became Rookie of the Year as a wide receiver for the Houston Oilers in 1969. He caught 41 passes for 529 yards and five touchdowns in 1970, returned 25 punts for 213 yards and an 8.5 average, and set the AFL record for punt and kickoff returns with 73. He caught an 86-yard touchdown pass that year for the AFL's longest and had a 63 yarder in 1970. LeVias was responsible for almost half the Oilers' yardage in 1970. The physicality of the pro game wore on LeVias, who famously remarked, "As the season progresses I get lighter, faster and more afraid."
LeVias was traded to San Diego in 1971, leading the team with 30 catches for 536 yards, a 17.9 average, and three touchdowns in 1973. The pro game eventually became unappealing to LeVias, who had already prepared for life after football, working for the Conoco oil company and having a partnership in a Houston men's clothing store even while playing. He played for the Chargers through the 1974 season.
He was one of 16 pro footballers given the keys to the city of Beaumont. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1995 and to the College Football Hall of Fame in 2003. In 2008, HBO produced a documentary, Breaking the Huddle: The Integration of College Football which highlighted Coach Hayden Fry and the racism and challenges Jerry LeVias' faced as the first black player in the Southwest Conference. He continues to work with the Houston Texans as a Texans Ambassador.
Mel and Miller Farr, also professional football players and Hall of Fame inductees, are his cousins. Jerry LeVias was inducted into the Museum of the Gulf Coast-Sports Hall of Fame in 1999.
... See MoreSee Less

Happy Birthday Jerry LeVias
Born: Sept. 5, 1946 in Beaumont, Texas

Jerry LeVias attended Hebert High School where he played quarterback. Though he was small (59 and 177 pounds) he possessed great speed. Out of high school he was probably closer to 57” and only 140 pounds.
LeVias was the first black athlete to receive an athletic scholarship in the Southwestern Conference, attending Southern Methodist University. At the time the SWC was made up of all the larger Texas universities, and the University of Arkansas. While at SMU, LeVias made athletic and academic All-America teams and contributed to the Mustangs first conference title in 18 years. LeVias wore the number 23 (for Psalm 23) which he also wore during his professional career, at his grandmothers insistence.
In an interview with the Houston Chronicle, LeVias called his years at SMU living hell due to the abuse he received from opposition players and, to some extent, his own contemporaries and stated that he would read the Serenity Prayer every morning before leaving for the day to get by. At that time, he was one of the few black students at SMU and the city of Dallas itself was still not fully integrated. Despite the unconditional support from SMU head coach Hayden Fry, LeVias was still a frequent target and recalled that he once overheard an alumnus telling Fry that he would withdraw his support from the university if Fry continued playing LeVias.
His records as a receiver still stand: 15 passes caught in one game (1968); 80 passes caught in one season (1968); 155 career catches; 1,131 yards receiving (1968); 2,275 career yards receiving; and a tied record for touchdown receptions in one game (3) and season record of TD receptions (8).  He was chosen All-SWC in 1966, 1967, and 1968, and was an All-American as a senior.
Initially, considered too small for the NFL, LeVias became Rookie of the Year as a wide receiver for the Houston Oilers in 1969.  He caught 41 passes for 529 yards and five touchdowns in 1970, returned 25 punts for 213 yards and an 8.5 average, and set the AFL record for punt and kickoff returns with 73.  He caught an 86-yard touchdown pass that year for the AFLs longest and had a 63 yarder in 1970. LeVias was responsible for almost half the Oilers yardage in 1970. The physicality of the pro game wore on LeVias, who famously remarked, As the season progresses I get lighter, faster and more afraid.
LeVias was traded to San Diego in 1971, leading the team with 30 catches for 536 yards, a 17.9 average, and three touchdowns in 1973. The pro game eventually became unappealing to LeVias, who had already prepared for life after football, working for the Conoco oil company and having a partnership in a Houston mens clothing store even while playing. He played for the Chargers through the 1974 season.
He was one of 16 pro footballers given the keys to the city of Beaumont. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1995 and to the College Football Hall of Fame in 2003. In 2008, HBO produced a documentary, Breaking the Huddle: The Integration of College Football which highlighted Coach Hayden Fry and the racism and challenges Jerry LeVias faced as the first black player in the Southwest Conference. He continues to work with the Houston Texans as a Texans Ambassador. 
Mel and Miller Farr, also professional football players and Hall of Fame inductees, are his cousins. Jerry LeVias was inducted into the Museum of the Gulf Coast-Sports Hall of Fame in 1999.

Comment on Facebook

Happy birthday!

Happy birthday!

Happy Birthday

Happy Birthday, gcr

Nice guy! Great Player!

Probably the most interesting side note in this story, occurred when LeVias told Johnny Carson on the Tonight Show, he was from Beaumont, the pro football capital of the world. It led to the honoring of 16 NFL players from the area, and national attention. I was there at the old Harvest Club the night the event took place.

Happy birthday 🎊🎉

Happy Birthday and congratulations on your wonderful accomplishments!

Happy Birthday. Thanks for representing our area!

View more comments

... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

Drinks on Pearl 💥💥

Andrea Hall ❤️

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons

This message is only visible to site admins

PPCA Error: Due to Facebook API changes on September 4, 2020, it will no longer be possible to display a feed from a Facebook Page you are not an admin of. The Facebook feed below is not using a valid Access Token for this Facebook page and so will stop updating after this date.
Olivia, Martha, Rene, Martha, and Octavio are visitors from Chicago! This is their third time visiting the museum. They're big Janis Joplin fans, and they love 60s music. They bought tons of shirts and souvenirs from our gift shop!  Thanks for stopping by and safe travels!        ✌️❤️ 🗺️ #janisjoplin #chicago #visitportarthurtx
Happy Birthday Jerry LeVias
Born: Sept. 5, 1946 in Beaumont, Texas

Jerry LeVias attended Hebert High School where he played quarterback. Though he was small (5'9" and 177 pounds) he possessed great speed. Out of high school he was probably closer to 5'7” and only 140 pounds.
LeVias was the first black athlete to receive an athletic scholarship in the Southwestern Conference, attending Southern Methodist University. At the time the SWC was made up of all the larger Texas universities, and the University of Arkansas. While at SMU, LeVias made athletic and academic All-America teams and contributed to the Mustangs' first conference title in 18 years. LeVias wore the number 23 (for Psalm 23) which he also wore during his professional career, at his grandmother's insistence.
In an interview with the Houston Chronicle, LeVias called his years at SMU "living hell" due to the abuse he received from opposition players and, to some extent, his own contemporaries and stated that he would read the Serenity Prayer every morning before leaving for the day to get by. At that time, he was one of the few black students at SMU and the city of Dallas itself was still not fully integrated. Despite the unconditional support from SMU head coach Hayden Fry, LeVias was still a frequent target and recalled that he once overheard an alumnus telling Fry that he would withdraw his support from the university if Fry continued playing LeVias.
His records as a receiver still stand: 15 passes caught in one game (1968); 80 passes caught in one season (1968); 155 career catches; 1,131 yards receiving (1968); 2,275 career yards receiving; and a tied record for touchdown receptions in one game (3) and season record of TD receptions (8).  He was chosen All-SWC in 1966, 1967, and 1968, and was an All-American as a senior.
Initially, considered too small for the NFL, LeVias became Rookie of the Year as a wide receiver for the Houston Oilers in 1969.  He caught 41 passes for 529 yards and five touchdowns in 1970, returned 25 punts for 213 yards and an 8.5 average, and set the AFL record for punt and kickoff returns with 73.  He caught an 86-yard touchdown pass that year for the AFL's longest and had a 63 yarder in 1970. LeVias was responsible for almost half the Oilers' yardage in 1970. The physicality of the pro game wore on LeVias, who famously remarked, "As the season progresses I get lighter, faster and more afraid."
LeVias was traded to San Diego in 1971, leading the team with 30 catches for 536 yards, a 17.9 average, and three touchdowns in 1973. The pro game eventually became unappealing to LeVias, who had already prepared for life after football, working for the Conoco oil company and having a partnership in a Houston men's clothing store even while playing. He played for the Chargers through the 1974 season.
He was one of 16 pro footballers given the keys to the city of Beaumont. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1995 and to the College Football Hall of Fame in 2003. In 2008, HBO produced a documentary, Breaking the Huddle: The Integration of College Football which highlighted Coach Hayden Fry and the racism and challenges Jerry LeVias' faced as the first black player in the Southwest Conference. He continues to work with the Houston Texans as a Texans Ambassador. 
Mel and Miller Farr, also professional football players and Hall of Fame inductees, are his cousins. Jerry LeVias was inducted into the Museum of the Gulf Coast-Sports Hall of Fame in 1999.
Happy Birthday Mark Chesnutt
Born: Sept. 6, 1963 in Beaumont, Texas

Mark Chesnutt began singing as a member of the junior high school choir. While in high school, he formed a country band with the help and encouragement of his father, also a country music singer. Chesnutt made his first record in 1981 at seventeen, recording six releases for the AXBAR label in San Antonio. He also recorded two more for the Cherry label in Houston. However, none of these achieved widespread success. 

For ten years, Chesnutt honed his talents in Beaumont honky-tonks like Cutter's, Doc Holliday's, and Get Down Brown's. Finally, in 1990, he recorded a song he had found in Nashville called "Too Cold at Home" for the Cherry label. As a testament to Chesnutt's talent, fellow East Texan and future duet partner, George Jones, wrote the liner notes for the critically heralded, platinum-certified debut album. "This boy from Beaumont is the real deal," Jones declared proudly. On July 20, 1990, "Too Cold at Home" reached number 2 on the country music charts, leading to a contract with MCA Records. 

Subsequent releases such as "Brother Jukebox," "Blame it on Texas," "Your Love is a Miracle," "Broken Promise Land," and "Old Flames Have New Names" were all top ten recordings, and "I'll Think of Something" reached number 1 during the summer of 1992. In 1993, Chesnutt received the "Horizon" Award from the Country Music Association. Since his debut, the country baritone has racked up ten Number One singles and three platinum album awards. 

Chestnutt has stated that during his latter years at Decca and MCA, he was constantly pressured by label heads to record more mainstream-friendly country pop instead of the traditional sounds featured in his earlier albums, due to the genre's shift away from neotraditional country for which Chestnutt is known. He also said that some of the tracks on Savin' the Honky Tonk were songs that the major labels had rejected, and that he would "rather sell 100,000 albums [of traditional country] than 6 million of something I wasn't happy with."

He currently resides in Jasper with his wife and children and frequently lends his name and talent to promoting development in the southeast Texas region. A die-hard southeast Texan, Chesnutt has never lived outside of the area.
Come Visit The Museum of the Gulf Coast
Open Mon - Sat (9-5)
"Texas State Historical Association"
September 8th, 1938 -- Port Arthur and Orange County connected by bridge
On this day in 1938, the bridge over the Neches River connecting Port Arthur and Orange County was dedicated, replacing the Dryden Ferry. As a result of a contest in 1957 it became known as the "Rainbow Bridge." The bridge was financed by the county, state, and federal governments under the Public Works Administration at a cost of $2,750,000. Beaumont representatives opposed the bridge until a compromise of 176 feet clearance was reached. The clearance was to allow the tallest ship afloat at the time (the Navy dirigible tender USS Patoka) to pass and reach Beaumont's upstream dock. This made the bridge the most elevated highway bridge over tidal waters in the world and the largest bridge built by the Texas Highway Department. No ship ever came close to hitting the bottom of the bridge.
Happy Birthday Tim McKyer
Born: Sept. 5, 1963 in Port Arthur
Cornerback Tim McKyer was born in Orlanda, and grew up in Port Arthur, graduating from Lincoln High School in 1982. He went on to play football at the University of Texas at Arlington.
 Drafted by the San Francisco 49ers in the third round in 1986, McKyer played with the club for three seasons. He was chosen All-Pro in both 1988 and 1989. McKyer was also part of the 1988 and 1989 San Francisco 49ers Super Bowl championship teams. During the 1989 season, he led the team's secondary in interceptions, with seven. McKyer moved to the Miami Dolphins in 1990 but remained for only one season. He was credited by coach Don Shula with helping Miami reach the playoffs for the first time since 1985.
Still highly regarded by NFL coaches, Tim was traded by the Dolphins to the Atlanta Falcons in 1991 for 3rd and 12th round draft picks. McKyer stayed with the Falcons through the 1992 season and then played for the Detroit Lions, Pittsburgh Steelers, Carolina Panthers, and the Denver Broncos. During his final season in 1997, McKyer won his third Super Bowl, with the Denver Broncos.
 In addition to his athletic ability, he is well regarded in Port Arthur, and elsewhere for his work with schoolchildren and for the endowment of a scholarship in the Port Arthur Independent School District.
Happy Birthday Calvin Shepherd
Born - Sept. 4, 1951 in Port Arthur, Tx
Died - July 29, 1995 

   Calvin Shepherd graduated from Port Arthur’s Lincoln High School in 1970. Upon graduation, Shepherd joined the Marines and served as a Private First Class Machine Gunner in Vietnam.

   During his service, Shepherd was awarded a National Defense Service Medal and an All Marine Certificate and won the All Marines Boxing Championship.

   Shepherd was also named All Hawaiian Boxing Champion and All Southern South and North Dakota Boxing Champion. Shepherd’s most outstanding boxing achievement was winning the 1983 World Athletic Association, Bantamweight Championship under the guidance of manager and trainer, Dick Menchaca, also an inductee in our Sports Hall of Fame. Shepherd, then 30, defeated boxer Mondo Loredo of Corpus Christi with a technical knockout in the seventh round of the championship match. 

During his career, Shepherd fought on four world title fight cards. He was inducted to the All-Marine Boxing Hall of Fame in 2017, and the Museum of the Gulf Coast-Sports Hall of fame in 2008.