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2 days ago

Mammoth Cave National Park

Mysterious and beautiful “ice ribbons” (also known as frost flowers) dotted the landscape of Mammoth Cave National Park this morning. The ribbons/flowers form when liquid moisture inside the plant stem seeps out and freezes in the open air. Mammoth Cave encourages you to #FindYourPark and discover the wonders of nature. ... See MoreSee Less

 

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Beautiful! Thanks for posting. In Texas we call this frost weed. Is this the same plant or do different species do this?

Wow! I love this!!! I spent so much time hiking trails with my parents on Sunday afternoons there!! Thx for sharing!!

Gilbert Porter you really need to go soon to Mammoth Caves...so pretty.

At first it looked like trash but taking a closer look, wow. Nature is beautiful.

Beautiful....love the pics as long as I don't have to go in the cave myself😬

How cool, I had no idea about this! THANKS!

Craig, this is probably what we saw on our way to Buffalo Trace.

Chris, this is cool!! We have to go back and visit here.

Amazing

Amazing!

Beautiful place

Cool.

Beautiful!

So pretty

Have seen these. Beautiful

Are you there?

That is gorgeous!!!

Wow!

Michon Jennings Reece Caleb Reece

Gilbert Porter...cool stuff!!

Eli Wagner

Sidney!

Launcelle Bustamante

Kendra Wadsworth

Christy Bayne 🤔💓

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2 days ago

Mammoth Cave National Park

Discovery is ongoing and constant at Mammoth Cave. Passageways are being mapped and surveyed to this day. The history of maps at Mammoth Cave is storied, and each Monday from November 6-27, 2017, we will be sharing stories behind some of Mammoth Cave’s earliest, famous, and forgotten maps.

While the Edmund Lee Map we learned about last week was a masterpiece—with its beautiful multi-colored passageways and detailed layouts of specific locations—arguably the most famous map was still on the horizon. A young German by the name of Max Kämper visited the United States in 1908 to learn English and study American manufacturing techniques. However, Kämper took up an additional project while visiting Mammoth Cave.

Kämper exhausted all possible tour routes and even some additional side trips during his stay at the cave. Albert Janin, trustee of the Mammoth Cave Estate, took note of Kämper’s fearlessness and caving prowess. In a letter to cave owners, Janin wrote “…at last the man had appeared whom I had been waiting for and who would, if anybody could, solve the problem whether or not there was anything more of note and interest to discover in the Mammoth Cave.”

All this exploring was not to be done alone; thus, Kämper would need a guide to help him through the meandering passageways of the cave. The guide up to the task of discovery was Ed Bishop, a man thought to be the grand-nephew of enslaved guide Stephen Bishop who produced his own extensive map of the Mammoth Cave system in 1842.

Ed Bishop and Max Kämper would adventure beyond an area of the cave known as “Ultima Thule.” Ultima Thule is Latin for literally “the last Thule” and is used to define the furthest extent of travel and discovery. Bishop and Kämper crossed Mammoth Cave’s last Thule by crawling through what was believed to be a solid, impenetrable wall deep within the cave. Janin describes being led to this passage and in order to traverse it Janin had to “lie flat on [his] back and be dragged by the feet between two big slabs of rock.” Furthermore, Janin wrote he had to “…twist my body and crawl in every conceivable way….” The payoffs for these exploits were tremendous.

Kämper was a skilled engineer in addition to being an excellent caver. Guided by Ed Bishop, Kämper created a map that took eight months of surveying to complete. The map was made using five colors—each color representing a different level of the cave. Kämper and Bishop explored and mapped about 35 miles of passageways with great accuracy and detail. The map can be, and often is, used to this day.

Bishop and Kämper discovered many pits and domes, two waterfalls, and several large chambers—one complete with growing stalactite formations. The largest of these rooms was named “Violet City,” named after cave owner Violet Blair Janin. Today, visitors can still experience Violet City on the Violet City Lantern tour typically offered during the summer schedule. Tune in next week as we continue telling the stories behind the #maps at Mammoth Cave and remember to #FindYourPark! #MapMonday #NPS101
... See MoreSee Less

Discovery is ongoing and constant at Mammoth Cave. Passageways are being mapped and surveyed to this day.  The history of maps at Mammoth Cave is storied, and each Monday from November 6-27, 2017, we will be sharing stories behind some of Mammoth Cave’s earliest, famous, and forgotten maps.

While the Edmund Lee Map we learned about last week was a masterpiece—with its beautiful multi-colored passageways and detailed layouts of specific locations—arguably the most famous map was still on the horizon. A young German by the name of Max Kämper visited the United States in 1908 to learn English and study American manufacturing techniques. However, Kämper took up an additional project while visiting Mammoth Cave.

Kämper exhausted all possible tour routes and even some additional side trips during his stay at the cave. Albert Janin, trustee of the Mammoth Cave Estate, took note of Kämper’s fearlessness and caving prowess. In a letter to cave owners, Janin wrote “…at last the man had appeared whom I had been waiting for and who would, if anybody could, solve the problem whether or not there was anything more of note and interest to discover in the Mammoth Cave.”

All this exploring was not to be done alone; thus, Kämper would need a guide to help him through the meandering passageways of the cave. The guide up to the task of discovery was Ed Bishop, a man thought to be the grand-nephew of enslaved guide Stephen Bishop who produced his own extensive map of the Mammoth Cave system in 1842.

Ed Bishop and Max Kämper would adventure beyond an area of the cave known as “Ultima Thule.” Ultima Thule is Latin for literally “the last Thule” and is used to define the furthest extent of travel and discovery. Bishop and Kämper crossed Mammoth Cave’s last Thule by crawling through what was believed to be a solid, impenetrable wall deep within the cave. Janin describes being led to this passage and in order to traverse it Janin had to “lie flat on [his] back and be dragged by the feet between two big slabs of rock.” Furthermore, Janin wrote he had to “…twist my body and crawl in every conceivable way….” The payoffs for these exploits were tremendous.

Kämper was a skilled engineer in addition to being an excellent caver. Guided by Ed Bishop, Kämper created a map that took eight months of surveying to complete. The map was made using five colors—each color representing a different level of the cave. Kämper and Bishop explored and mapped about 35 miles of passageways with great accuracy and detail. The map can be, and often is, used to this day.

Bishop and Kämper discovered many pits and domes, two waterfalls, and several large chambers—one complete with growing stalactite formations. The largest of these rooms was named “Violet City,” named after cave owner Violet Blair Janin. Today, visitors can still experience Violet City on the Violet City Lantern tour typically offered during the summer schedule. Tune in next week as we continue telling the stories behind the #maps at Mammoth Cave and remember to #FindYourPark! #MapMonday #NPS101Image attachmentImage attachment

 

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Awesome! I have the Kamper map (that I bought at the cave store) on my man cave wall.

Yesterday park rangers displayed artwork for the Dream Rocket Project representing nearly 30 schools in the United States. Among the 120 pieces of artwork, many are from schools in adjacent counties to the park. Adair County High, Bristow Elementary, Drakes Creek Middle School, Greenwood High, Hart County High, Munfordville Elementary, Rich Pond Elementary, and South Edmonson Elementary are among those local schools represented.

The theme given to students this year in creating their artwork was, "The World Above and Below." Come out to the Mammoth Cave Visitor Center to see and enjoy how students interpreted this theme to create their original pieces of art. The artwork is on display now until January 20, 2018.
... See MoreSee Less

Yesterday park rangers displayed artwork for the Dream Rocket Project representing nearly 30 schools in the United States.  Among the 120 pieces of artwork, many are from schools in adjacent counties to the park. Adair County High, Bristow Elementary, Drakes Creek Middle School, Greenwood High, Hart County High, Munfordville Elementary, Rich Pond Elementary,  and South Edmonson Elementary are among those local schools represented. 

The theme given to students this year in creating their artwork was, The World Above and Below.  Come out to the Mammoth Cave Visitor Center to see and enjoy how students interpreted this theme to create their original pieces of art.  The artwork is on display now until January 20, 2018.

 

Comment on Facebook

Love that racoon, and LOVE Mammoth Cave National Park. Thanks for this project. Eva/Bruce Wilcoxson

 

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